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You know its interesting. Why do people equate Curvaceous with Unhealthy? I am a solid size 16/18. I have done sports and do not overindulge in fats. My BP is good... And! I am a devout Fashionista! While it is hard, I do amass a list of designers who cater, understand, and sympathize to the Curvy.Confident.Chic Fashionista.
I guess everyone needs a scapegoat or reason for thier cause.

I don't think people equate "Curvaceous" with "Unhealthy." I think a bigger problem is women who are clearly overweight referring to themselves as "curvaceous" or "thick" (there is a difference) but it does not mean that women of any size don't have the right to beautiful clothes. You may be a solid 16/18, and that may be good for your height, weight and frame - but too many of us are not and hide behind these labels at the detriment of our health.

I am a 14/16 and it does not work for me so I am losing weight. I have been smaller before and I think I fit the definition of "curvaceous" in any dress size like a lot of other women with hips, butt, small waist, etc.

As for the difference between "curvaceous" "thick" or "fat" that depends on an individual woman's height, weight and proportion. The "healthy" designation should come from a doctor. I am working on a longer feature that relates to this issue that will be published this week.

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